COST Action "Multiscale Irradiation and Chemistry Driven Processes and Related Technologies" (MultIChem)

Radiation is an inevitable element of the world. It may affect life and likely was involved in its origin. The fundamental understanding of radiation was often at the heart of the most important scientific and technological breakthroughs (Maxwell theory, Einstein photo-effect, relic radiation, synchrotron, FEL, etc.) and it remains so. One of the big current challenges concerns the quantitative understanding of the complex processes in various systems, including the living ones, induced by their irradiation by photons, charged particles, or neutrons. These processes may lead, for instance, to the therapeutic effects of radiation, new pathways for the controlled fabrication of nanosystems with desired properties, energy conversion and storage, catalytic activity, or be in the heart of technologies for the construction of novel light sources. Despite a large variety of possible applications, the fundamental principles of irradiation-driven processes in different systems are similar. One of such features is the multiscale spatiotemporal nature of the processes extending the direct outcomes of irradiation over large time-and-space dimensions and linking them to a variety of relevant phenomena. The advances in this interdisciplinary area became possible only recently due to the development of powerful computers and modern experimental techniques.

The COST Action CA20129 "Multiscale Irradiation and Chemistry Driven Processes and Related Technologies" (MultIChem) aims to establish a broad international interdisciplinary, intersectoral cooperation to advance the fundamental understanding of the multiscale irradiation-driven processes and related technologies, paving the path towards major scientific and technological breakthroughs, and socio-economic impacts. By means of pioneering computational methods and modern experimental techniques, the Action will exploit irradiation-driven chemistry in selected applications and related technologies such as methods of controlled nanofabrication, nanocatalysis, development of novel types of radiosensitising nanoparticles, and radiotherapies.

Further information on the COST Action MultIChem can be found in the Memorandum of Understanding and on the dedicated webpage of the COST portal: